Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr Creative Commons

Elder-Beerman Parent Company To Liquidate, All Stores Set To Close

Elder-Beerman executives have announced the company is going out of business, impacting hundreds of jobs in the Miami Valley. A bankruptcy court hearing to approve the sale and wind-down of parent company Bon-Ton Stores, Inc. operations is scheduled for April 18, 2018. If the court approves the deal, a joint venture will acquire the inventory and certain other assets of the company. The Dayton Daily News reports all locations of the Midwest-based department store could close within 10 to 12 weeks. In a statement to WYSO, company officials say the stores, e-commerce and mobile platforms will remain open throughout the planned store-closing sales. Bon-Ton officials are expected to release more details about store liquidation plans and going-out-of-business sales following approval by the bankruptcy Court.

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Christian Reichert / Flickr Creative Commons

Poor Will's Almanack: April 17 - 23, 2018

Keeping a notebook of what happens every day in the small world around me, I often think about the cyclical quality of events in nature. The repeating quality of the sky and the landscape, is something similar to what sociologist Charles Taylor describes, in his book, A Secular Age, as "Higher Time" (as opposed to linear, “Secular Time”). In Secular Time, things happen in sequence, and the past always recedes like an expanding universe, and when something is past, it's past. Higher Time, on...

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NPR Newscaster Carl Kasell Dies At 84, After A Lifelong Career On-Air

Every weekday for more than three decades, his baritone steadied our mornings. Even in moments of chaos and crisis, Carl Kasell brought unflappable authority to the news. But behind that hid a lively sense of humor, revealed to listeners late in his career, when he became the beloved judge and official scorekeeper for Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! NPR's news quiz show. Kasell died Tuesday from complications from Alzheimer's disease in Potomac, Md. He was 84. He started preparing for the role of...

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Judy Johnson reads her poem "Rainspeak"

Conrad Balliet reads two poems by Marietta Ball

This year celebrates the 250th anniversary of the birth of Tecumseh and some of that celebration will take place at the Little Miami Conservancy Dinner on April 17th in Mason, Ohio. The keynote speaker will be writer and historian James Alexander Thom. He is the author of 'Panther in the Sky", "Follow the River", "Warrior Woman", and other novels. In this interview, Thom calls Tecumseh “one of the great American patriots” and says at the dinner he’ll talk to audience members about how the man’s life is still very relevant today.

 

A Used Library Furniture Sale with items individually priced, garage sale style, or best offer accepted at the first floor of the Dayton Metro Library Operations Center (formerly the Temporary Main Library), 120 S. Patterson Boulevard. Saturday, 10am - 4pm and Sunday, 1-4pm.

Jessica Strawser lives in Cincinnati-she was looking for the perfect setting for "Not That I Could Tell," her second novel. She decided that the ideal place for it would be a community that she enjoys visiting, the village of Yellow Springs, Ohio.

As this story of domestic suspense opens a woman has vanished along with her children and nobody seems to know where they might have gone. The missing woman had been going through a contentious divorce, she has been separated from her husband, a physician who is living in an apartment while the divorce proceedings are underway.

This year marks the 250th anniversary of the birth of Tecumseh and some of that celebration will take place at the Little Miami Conservancy dinner on April 17th in Mason, Ohio. The keynote speaker will be writer and historian James Alexander Thom. He is the author of Panther in the Sky, Follow the River, Warrior Woman, and other novels.

Unmanned-aerial drone technology is changing the way we live and work. And it’s not just Amazon and other corporate giants getting into the drone game. The multi-billion-dollar industry is forecast to grow exponentially in coming years. In today’s installment of our Scratch innovation series, we’ll hear about some of the surprising ways drones are altering –– even enhancing –– the human experience. And, as I found out, as more drones take to the skies, the unmanned systems are raising new questions for business, government and law enforcement.     

 

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State University is taking steps to cut $10 million from its current fiscal year budget ending June 30. University officials say the move is part of an effort to avoid state fiscal watch by adding money to Wright State's reserve fund, which was depleted by overspending.

Many WSU faculty members, already reeling from millions of dollars in budget cuts that took effect last year, say they’re not sure what’s left to cut.

U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Bryan Franks / public domain

Free health screenings, a community baby shower and health information forums are among the Dayton events happening in April as part of so-called National Minority Health Month. 

The month's events kicked off last week at the Neon Theatre, with a Dayton Council on Health Equity gathering aimed at promoting health improvement and awareness in Miami Valley communities of color.

 

Speaker Cliff Rosenberger of southwest Ohio says there's support for medical marijuana.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The Speaker of the Ohio House has resigned, days after he hired a lawyer and admitted he’d learned  the FBI was asking questions about him.

Speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville) announced his resignation at the Tuesday evening meeting of the House Republican caucus. He issued a statement that his actions have been ethical and lawful, but that the inquiry will likely take a long time and there are issues that lawmakers need to attend to.

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